Make your own free website on Tripod.com

The Shel Game


A WebQuest for 9th Grade English Class   

Designed by Art Hamilton

Leprechaun4@attbi.com



Task

Process

Evaluation

Conclusion

Credits

Teacher Page






Introduction   

anteater

"If you are a dreamer, a wisher, a liar,

A hope-er, a pray-er, and magic bean buyer...

If you're a pretender, come sit by my fire

For we have some flax-golden tales to spin,

Come in, come in!"

Shel Silverstein- Invitation


Poetry, poetry, poetry!  Do you recognize yourself in any of the lines above? You just finished a project on “Having Dinner with a Poet”.  And even if you didn’t know it, you spun a tale!  In this web quest, we will all become Pretenders.  We will play the roles of poetry analyst and interpreter.  You will create your own poem using a style and rhyme scheme that are similar to ones Shel Silverstein often used.

Why Shel Silverstein?  Well, he was a writer, an illustrator, a poet, a guitar player;- a songwriter, a performer, heart-warmer.  He wrote books and poetry and songs for people of all ages.  His poems have messages for young and old,- for big kids, little kids, who don’t like to be told…what to do.  Let us begin.  Sooooooo… "Come in, come in!"


Listen to Shel Recite The Toy Eater 

(If you can't hear the poem, you may have to download (Realplayer)

the toyeater


Task

Step 1

·    You will read a little bit about Shel Silverstein            

Shel Silverstein

·    You will study some his poems

·    You and a partner will interpret and analyze the rhyme scheme and meaning of selected poems


Step 2

·    You and your partner will each create a poem in Clerihew form

back to top



Process


1.    Click on the following three links to learn a little about Shel Silverstein

http://www.kidsreads.com/features/0204-silverstein-facts.asp

Shel Silverstein - The Academy of American Poets

                    http://www.harperchildrens.com/catalog/author_xml.asp?authorID=12731


2.    Print out the Bubble Map and use it to help determine the rhyme scheme for the following 5 poems: 



Shel Silverstein

·    Sick

·    Ticklish Tom


3.    *As you figure out each rhyme scheme, compare your bubble sheet to another group’s sheet.  If you have different schemes, brainstorm about how you got your answers and decide who (if anyone) should re-work their patterns.

back to top



4.    Print out the Analysis/Interpretation Sheet to help guide you through the reading of the following poems.  You and your partner can write out the answers on one sheet or you can audio-record your discussion of the poem using the questions to guide your discussion.

·    AntEater

·    Mari-Lou's Ride

·    Smart

       

5.    Click on the following link to learn how to write Clerihews.

How to Write a Clerihew


6.    Choose a specific person or thing and begin brainstorming your rhymes with your partner.  Here is an example to get you started.

Our teacher, a man named Hamilton

Likes ginger ale with his hot cross bun

A poet he isn't, but I know you will

Find his name on a ten-dollar bill!

   If you need help with rhymes, go to this site.  Just type in any word (names included) and it gives you rhymes for your word up to six syllables! 

RhymeZone


Highlight and print out the lines below to create your own Clerihew.

 

line 1_________________________________________________________________

line 2_________________________________________________________________


line 3_________________________________________________________________


line 4_________________________________________________________________



Use these lines  to create your second Clerihew.

 


line 1_________________________________________________________________


line 2_________________________________________________________________


line 3_________________________________________________________________


line 4_________________________________________________________________


unicorn



7.    Your final product can be:

·    Written

·    A tape recording (audio or video) of you and your partner reciting your Clerihews

·    A Power Point Presentation of your poem

back to top


Evaluation

Your finished products will be evaluated using the following rubric.  It lists in detail what you need to include in your product in order to get the highest possible score.

Name:________________________

Teacher:_______________________

Date :___________________
Title of Work:___________________









Criteria



Points

1
2

3
4


Clerihew Poem
(Written Form)
Your poem is missing a line(s).
 Your first line didn't name a person, you are missing some rhymes
Your poem has four lines. Your first line didn't name a person, you are missing some rhymes.
Your Poem has four lines, the first 2 rhyme, the second 2 rhyme. The first line names a person. Your poem is humorous.
Your Poem has four lines, the first 2 rhyme, the second 2 rhyme. The first line names a person and the second line ends with something that rhymes with that name. Your poem is humorous.


___


Clerihew Poem
(Power Point Presentation)
Your presentation is missing a line(s). You didn't name a person in the first line and you are missing some rhymes.
Your Presentation has slides that show four lines. The first line didn't name a person and you are missing some rhymes.
Your Presentation has slides that show four lines, the first 2 rhyme, the second 2 rhyme. The first line names a person. Your presentation is humorous.
Your Presentation has slides that show four lines, the first 2 rhyme, the second 2 rhyme. The first line names a person and the second line ends with something that rhymes with that name. Your presentation is humorous.


___


Clerihew Poem
(Audio or Video Tape)
Your performance/recital is missing a line or lines. You didn't name a person in the first line and you are missing some rhymes.
Your performance/recital includes four lines. The first line didn't name a person and you are missing some rhymes.
Your performance/recital includes four lines, the first 2 rhyme, the second 2 rhyme. The first line names a person. Your performance is humorous.
Your performance/recital includes four lines, the first 2 rhyme, the second 2 rhyme. The first line names a person and the second line ends with something that rhymes with that name. Your performance is humorous.


___





___





___




Total---->
___
Teacher Comments:





back to top



Conclusion            

Polishing stars


When you have finished this unit, you will have accomplished several things related to poetry.  You will have read and learned about Shel Silverstein and his style of poetry.  You will have interpreted poems and analyzed rhyme schemes.  You will have explored the Clerihew form of poetry and created your own Clerihew poem.


If you would like to read some more Shel Silverstein poems, click on these links:

http://www.fda.net/~s2art/poems.html

http://www.mtholyoke.edu/~htschofi/shel.htm


If you would like to read some poems written in a similar, humorous, nonsensical form by a poet who lived and wrote 115 years ago, go to this site.  His name was Edward Lear.

http://www.nonsenselit.org/Lear/learwk.htm

back to top


BONUS!  BONUS!  BONUS!   

If you can figure out why I included this song, you will get bonus points for your product!!!


Credits/References

All poems and illustrations are the original works of Shel Silverstein.  The lesson on Clerihews was taken from the  PoetryTeachers.Com website and was written by Kenn Nesbitt.  Thanks go to RhymeZone for their rhyming dictionary site.  Audio: Shel Silverstein Reads "The Toy Eater" is from the New York Times on the Web, wav belongs to Dr. Hook and Shel.  Thanks are also in order for all the other websites that provided a large offering of information about Shel Silverstein and his work.

Texts:

Silverstein, Shel. “Where the Sidewalk Ends” - HarperCollins Children's Books 1973


Silverstein, Shel.  “A Light in the Attic” - HarperCollins Children's Books 1981


Silverstein, Shel.  “Falling Up - Poems and Drawings” - HarperCollins Children's Books 1996



Web Sites:

http://www.fda.net/~s2art/poems.html

http://www.harperchildrens.com/catalog/author_xml.asp?authorID=12731

http://www.poetryteachers.com/poetclass/poetclass.html

http://www.kidsreads.com/features/0204-silverstein-facts.asp

http://www.mtholyoke.edu/~htschofi/shel.htm

http://e-bumpkins.shakz.com/shel.html

http://www.rhymezone.com/

http://www.poets.org/poets/poets.cfm?prmID=105

http://www.angelfire.com/anime2/mya2000/shel/index.html

http://www.angelfire.com/anime2/mya2000/shel/new_page_4.htm

http://www.angelfire.com/anime2/mya2000/shel/sidewalkstuff.htm

http://members.tripod.com/~ShelSilverstein/

http://www.education-world.com/standards/state/ma/index.shtml 

back to top



Teacher Page

This WebQuest addresses the Massachusetts D.O.E.  Learning Strands and Standards Criteria for 9th graders in the following areas:

·    Language Strand- General Standard #2, Questioning, Listening, Contributing and Standard #3, Oral Presentation

·    Reading and Literature Strand- General Standard #10, Genre, and General Standard #14, Poetry

·    Composition Strand- General Standard #19, Writing, and General Standard #21, Revising

·    Media Strand- General Standard #27, Media Production


This unit was written for a target audience of 9th grade English students.  It can easily be adapted for younger or older students by adding to, or adapting, the guided reading questions.  The questions can be re-phrased to be more analytical and interpretive, depending on your audience. Please feel free to work with them in whatever manner best suits your audience.

For teachers and others interested in more poetry activities, the Poetry Teachers site has a plethora of activities, contests, and ideas to motivate students to write.    

This lesson is also a great lead-in to the Limerick style of poetry made famous by Edward Lear.  

 
Edward Lear

For a treasure trove of nonsense poems, songs, drawings, and alphabets, go to Lear and the Limerick


Leprechaun4@attbi.com

back to top

Falling Up